Luigi Ceccarelli

ceccarelliLC_Vimeo_logo LC_Youtube_logoLC_Soundcloud_logo LC_Flickr_logoLC_Facebook_logoHe is a co-founding member of the “Edison Studio” and  since the 1970s he has worked as a composer of music with live electronics. He is interested in all forms of sound, irrespective of genre, and in the relationships between music and the performing arts.

 His work as a composer has brought him international recognition (Bourges Festival Prizes, UBU Prize – given by Italian theatre critics, Ars Electronica – Linz, MESS Festival Prize in Sarajevo, Special Prize at the BITEF Festival in Belgrade, “Hear” Prize by Hungarian Television, Opus Prize” from the “Conseil de la Musique du Quebec”). His works have been chosen many times for performance at the International Computer Music Conference and

 he has written various works for radio produced by the Italian broadcaster RAI and he composed work for theatre with “Teatro delle Albe”, “Fanny & Alexander”, and work for dance with “Wee Dance Company” and Robyn Orlin.
 Luigi Ceccarelli has held the post of Professor of Electronic Music Conservatory of Music of Latina.

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Katharine Norman – “Several Infinities” (an emblem book)

LC_SoundingArtCNorman K. 2003 “Several Infinities” (an emblem book) – Emblem: a moving ribbon”. In Sounding Art – Height Literary Excursions through Electronic Music pp.33-38. Burlington VT (USA):Ashgate Publishing Company
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Contains an essay on “BIRDS for bass clarinet and birds songs” by Luigi Ceccarelli

Acquista Online

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Katharine Norman, Goldsmiths College, University of London, UK
Sounding Art is a journey that traverses a variety of aesthetic approaches to making electronic music.
Katharine Norman, herself a composer, writes from a highly personal and unusual perspective. The series of eight extended essays is a long way from conventional academic writing, and covers far more than the traditional repertoire. The essays are themselves literary compositions, whose structure, language and visual appearance are carefully constructed to amplify their theme – whether it be microsound or acousmatic art, electroacoustic or radiophonic music, plunderphonics, turntables or noise. In addition to this listening travel, these essays take illustrative byways through subjects as diverse as map-making, metaphors of flight, emblem books, the history of recording, translating and walks in the rain. The accompanying CD is a route map for the ears, providing a great number of examples by many different composers and artists. Sounding Art is not a history book; it is a book about what sound might mean, and it’s an invitation to listen.